Tourist attractions from behind: eerie angles of famous landmarks

0

Shutterstock/Jennifer Bui

Aside from Kim Kardashian and the Beatles’ “Hello, Goodbye” EP, few things are better known for their backs than their fronts. And this is especially true for landmarks and tourist attractions, which visitors most often pay homage to from their most famous and photogenic vantage points.

That’s why we thought it would be fun to mix them up and find photos of some of the world’s most recognized sights taken from behind.

Shutterstock

The Hollywood sign

Los Angeles, CA
Nothing epitomizes LA quite like the Hollywood sign that towers over the city – but instead of gawking like a basic tourist, soak up the filled with smog view it overlooks.

cat butt
Shutterstock

The Great Sphinx of Giza

Cairo, Egypt
The world’s oldest monumental statue (aka The Terrifying One, aka Father of Dread) has a famous noseless face, but also appears to have some lesser-known trash in the trunk.

Shutterstock

Statue of Liberty

New York, NY
After welcoming millions of immigrants to New York with her stern face and bookish character, few realize that Lady Liberty is totally working on this update.

Shutterstock

The little Mermaid

Copenhagen, Denmark
Despite its disappointingly small size, this 102-year-old statue – a gift from brewer Carl Jacobsen to the city – attracts a million visitors each year. In case you’re skeptical and/or haven’t even heard of the thing, take a look from behind – it’s a lot of tourists begging for a photo.

Shutterstock

Christ the Redeemer

Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
That’s probably how the Brazilian soccer team felt when they lost 7-1 to Germany in the 2014 World Cup (‘because he turned his back on them, got it?).

pyramid
Shutterstock

Great Pyramid of Giza

Cairo, Egypt
Usually photographed to look like mythical fortresses deep in the desert, few people realize that the pyramids actually graze Cairo. You can even see them from inside the room pizza hut.

Shutterstock

Machu Picchu

Aguas Calientes, Peru
The ubiquitous view of this ancient Inca city, up close and backed by the rugged cliffs of Huayna Picchu, is so ingrained in our minds that seeing it from a different perspective is almost startling. Although it is true that it is probably more of a side view.

Shutterstock

The Thinker

Paris, France
The Thinker from the front; Hulk seen from behind. Those glutes.

Shutterstock

The Acropolis of Athens

Athens, Greece
Usually seen perched atop a cliff above Athens, this sight pretty much explains why the ancient Greeks chose to build a citadel there.

flickr/Jérémy Ladan

The Brandenburg Gate

Berlin, Germany
Ok, so it kinda looks the same from the front as it does from the back. But, despite the opulent cobbled boulevard it faces, the rear is clearly aware of heavy traffic.

flickr/Andrew Lawson

Statue of Lord Murugan

Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
The 140ft tall statue of Hindu deity Lord Murugan (the second tallest in the world!) guards the Batu Caves and offers a pretty sick view of Kuala Lumpur from its perch.

Shutterstock

The blue domed church

Santorini, Greece
Usually seen flanked by striking white buildings, the scene from behind explains why the town of Oia is so precariously built into the side of a cliff.

Share.

About Author

Comments are closed.